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"Realizing a vision for literacy coaching"

Feb 4, 2009

Coaching as a verb

The previous blog about retaining coaches' positions continues to be important, and I hope that it continues this spring! Another -conversation may be useful, too. Besides being talked about as a position or role, literacy coaching can be talked about as a verb. This is another way that we can keep the concept of coaching alive in these hard budget times. It makes me think about:

-Doing Professional Development Sessions -Leading Data Analysis Sessions -Leading Study Groups -Finding Resources -Conversations “On-the-Fly” -Organizing Peer-Coaching -Assisting with Action Research -Doing Modeling and Demonstration Teaching -Leading Teaching Labs or Lesson Study -Coaching Cycles: Pre, During, Post

What does "literacy coaching" as a verb make you think about? I'm not sure that we have yet explored all of the ways we might "coach."

Comments (5) »

Nov 14, 2008

Why use coaches?

The question "Why use reading/literacy or instructional coaches?" is going to become more and more important to answer well in the coming months. I can think of three points we ought to emphasize. Coaching helps to: 1. Improve teacher quality 2. Improve student achievement 3. Retain beginning teachers

What are your thoughts?

Comments (12) »

Mar 25, 2008

How Are You Doing?

Are you finding yourself in the final stretch of a long winter? Are you in the middle or nearing the end of state testing? Are you anxious for Spring Break, nice weather, flowers, and the beach?!

As a literacy coach who is supposed to be supporting others, this can be your low energy point of the year. How are you doing?

I am wondering what suggestions we might give each other as to ways that coaches can practice self-care. Jan Burkins in her recent book Coaching for Balance [see IRA publications] recommends that coaches can:

  • create their own environments,
  • leave some margins in their work lives,
  • plan for their own professional growth,
  • take care of their bodies,
  • go home,
  • practice positive habits,
  • recognize their limitations,
  • let go of some of the responsibility,
  • build a support system under themselves, and
  • plan nurturing transitions to and from work.

In what ways do you agree with Jan? What are additional ways that you practice self-care as a literacy, reading, and/or instructional coach?

(P.S. Jan will be speaking at IRA as part of a session on literacy coaching scheduled for TH, 5/8, 12:30-3:15 in Georgia World Congress Center B203.)

Comments (6) »
 

Blog

Feb 4, 2009

Coaching as a verb

The previous blog about retaining coaches' positions continues to be important, and I hope that it continues this spring! Another -conversation may be useful, too. Besides being talked about as a position or role, literacy coaching can be talked about as a verb. This is another way that we can keep the concept of coaching alive in these hard budget times. It makes me think about:

-Doing Professional Development Sessions -Leading Data Analysis Sessions -Leading Study Groups -Finding Resources -Conversations “On-the-Fly” -Organizing Peer-Coaching -Assisting with Action Research -Doing Modeling and Demonstration Teaching -Leading Teaching Labs or Lesson Study -Coaching Cycles: Pre, During, Post

What does "literacy coaching" as a verb make you think about? I'm not sure that we have yet explored all of the ways we might "coach."

Comments (5) »

Nov 14, 2008

Why use coaches?

The question "Why use reading/literacy or instructional coaches?" is going to become more and more important to answer well in the coming months. I can think of three points we ought to emphasize. Coaching helps to: 1. Improve teacher quality 2. Improve student achievement 3. Retain beginning teachers

What are your thoughts?

Comments (12) »

Mar 25, 2008

How Are You Doing?

Are you finding yourself in the final stretch of a long winter? Are you in the middle or nearing the end of state testing? Are you anxious for Spring Break, nice weather, flowers, and the beach?!

As a literacy coach who is supposed to be supporting others, this can be your low energy point of the year. How are you doing?

I am wondering what suggestions we might give each other as to ways that coaches can practice self-care. Jan Burkins in her recent book Coaching for Balance [see IRA publications] recommends that coaches can:

  • create their own environments,
  • leave some margins in their work lives,
  • plan for their own professional growth,
  • take care of their bodies,
  • go home,
  • practice positive habits,
  • recognize their limitations,
  • let go of some of the responsibility,
  • build a support system under themselves, and
  • plan nurturing transitions to and from work.

In what ways do you agree with Jan? What are additional ways that you practice self-care as a literacy, reading, and/or instructional coach?

(P.S. Jan will be speaking at IRA as part of a session on literacy coaching scheduled for TH, 5/8, 12:30-3:15 in Georgia World Congress Center B203.)

Comments (6) »

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